Rule Changes Ontario Moose and Deer Hunters Should Be Aware of

Tom's 2010 Moose

Tom's 2010 Moose

1)  hunters using natural attractants (for example deer urine used for hunting)
2)  anyone who wishes to transport or possess carcasses or their high risk parts of any member of the deer family (moose, deer, caribou) into Ontario from out of province

 

 

Refer to these Pages for More Info:

http://www.ontario.ca/cwd
http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/en/Business/FW/2ColumnSubPage/STEL02_168766.html

If you hunt in Ontario, natural attractants containing body parts of any member of the deer family may no longer be possessed or used for the purposes of hunting.

If you hunt outside of Ontario and want to possess and/or bring in carcasses or parts of members of the deer family (i.e. deer, American elk, moose and caribou) from out of province, you need to know about the new regulations. These changes are now in effect.
Natural attractants containing body parts of any member of the deer family may no longer be possessed or used for the purposes of hunting
Possession and use of products that contain body parts of any member of the deer family, including blood, urine, gland oils, and other fluids, for the purposes of hunting, is no longer permitted. Hunters will still be allowed to possess and use artificial or plant-based products that can attract wildlife or be used as a cover scent, but they must not contain any body parts of a member of the deer family.
Possession of out-of-province harvested carcasses and their high-risk parts of moose and caribou banned
The possession in Ontario of high-risk parts of moose and caribou killed in other jurisdictions is no longer permitted. Possessing high-risk parts from all other members of the deer family killed out-of-province was banned in 2005.
Generally, it is now illegal to possess any part of the antlers, head, brain, eyes, tonsils, hide, hooves, lymph nodes, spleen, mammary glands, entrails, internal organs or spinal column of any member of the deer family that has been killed outside Ontario. For details about this regulation and limited exceptions to this prohibition, see http://www.ontario.ca/cwd

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